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Turning Over New Leaf

Saturday, December 11, 2010

Plan For Academic Excellence: Political Correctness










Plan For Academic Excellence: Political Correctness




I really appreciate the politically correct academic world in which we reside.

 
It seems like more and more high school teachers have to face new student groups each year, with 50-50 gender differentiations, and they are always looking for fresh ideas. High school classes frequently consist, in part, of young females who, although not yet chronologically mature in terms of calendar years despite being trapped in clearly identifiable adult human forms, are fully capable of handling all of their daily gender-neutral tasks. Usually, one or two are standoffish, having been recipients of parental asset infusion. Some are hormonally agitated. A few are overly aerosoled. Many are cosmetically oversaturated. All wear jeans that are anatomically under circulated.

 
The other half of a typical high school class is male, and collectively suffers from chronic immaturity. Some members are socially malformed. A few are conversational minimalists. Many have frequent alternative mental destinations. Most of the male half of the class is gastronomically expressive. One or two of them suffer from rectal-cranial inversion. All are romantically automated.

 
So many of today's students are energetically declined. When they finally move, they hit social speed bumps they cannot negotiate. They often put their heads down on their desks, obviously to ration their consciousness between night and daytime, and their teachers get to enjoy their odor-retentive athletic footwear.

 
After of year of mistreatment, heavily compensated teachers are asked to chaperone the junior pre-coital rhythmic experience, with a band so loud the gymnasium ceiling loses plaster in various places.

 
I can understand how some consideration must be given to the down and out in society. However, they are not all disadvantaged. We can change things, but not with political correctness. How about this for a plan - Tell them the truth.

20 comments:

  1. Did u ever watch A&E's Teach with Tony Danza? I watched all 5 episodes... I saw the frustration he dealt with as well as his learning from the seasoned teachers... He had decided to give teaching a try since that was what he originally set out to do... It is a sad fact of how today's teens are and guess what? they are the future.. I remember being in h.s. and we had only a small minority who didn't give a darn... I am dealing w/ a 20 yr. old son who has no interest even in the j.c. he is attending.. which baffles me and his sisters because his sisters both went to UC's in Cali... One daughter was an honor student and was part of the 10%... the other graduated with a high B avg. and she is working for a non profit which was what she always wanted to do... The 10% daughter is working as well, in a field that she never thought she would get into... In the meantime, the 3 of us have an idea as to why my son/their brother is in the funk he is in... dealing w/grief, dealing with becoming a 'man'... More could be said but I don't want to monopolize....

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  2. I work in a college where i help to run and manage a programme for 14-16 year olds. I agree that this is a difficult age and stage in their lifes and development. But at this age you are starting off in life on your journey of self discovery and life. I believe in self expression and finding out things for yourself. As a parent you can guide your child to what is right and wrong, but as to what suits them what they wear etc is a learning curve for them. I may be barking up the wrong tree after your post and you may have been trying to convey something else...and i suppose people can read and interpret things differently. Hope your well, happy weekend. Dee ;-)

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  3. Truth. What a novel concept.

    When my youngest daughter was in high school, it was a constant challenge to keep her focused on what was important, when all around her political correctness, fatigue, fear, or whatever, illustrated that mediocrity was acceptable, kindness was not cool, and whatever you could do and not get caught at was morally valid.

    After one reality check conversation, she whined, "Why do you have such high expectations for me?" And I replied, "High?! These are the minimum standards for being a successful person and a decent human being."

    Now that she is out of high school, she sees that indeed there is a whole world out there of people who value effort and integrity.

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  4. PS--Speaking of truth, your post reminded me of a great off topic truth story. When my mom was dying of cancer, I wanted to take my children to see her one more time.

    She didn't want me to bring them. She asked, "What will you tell them?" I replied, "I'll tell them the truth."

    Long pause. "Do you think that's wise?" she asked dubiously.

    "Yes, mom, I do."

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  5. @Galen: In response to your last comment.. I';ve always told my kids to tell the truth,, the truth always comes out..and not telling the truth is worse and so are the effects.

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  6. Dear JJ,
    Graat, it seems we are in my coumtry!

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  7. KBF: Been there. I understand completely. I spend as much time giving them a dose of reality as I do teaching. You pour your heart and soul into them and once they hit the "system," it's out of your control. One thing I swore I would always do, and have done, was to make sure I never imposed my views on your kids. It's not my place. If I am hired to teach, I should teach. I have no business second guessing someone else's views on life. The feeling is not universal.

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  8. Dee: I do not disagree. My whole point is that if I am hired to teach, I should teach, not persuade vulnerable minds as to my political positions. I feed them the curriculum, not my politically correct slant. Have a great weekend.

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  9. Galen Pearl: We think alike. I set the bar HIGH. I am there to teach, not to make them feel good about themselves by softening the terms we use according to political whims.

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  10. Miriam: Thank you.

    FanaticoUm: I am sorry.

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  11. Yup, I think 'truth' definitely trumps 'political correctness' at times. The truth is loud & clear and avoiding the truth can't lead to anywhere good. The truth always seems to have a way of catching up with you anyway and when it does it can hit hard.
    If it is necessary to speak the truth to someone it doesn't have to be delivered in a callous & cold way,it can be delivered effectively with kind & compassionate words.
    Political correctness has it's place but I sometimes feel that it can create a wall that effectively retards or obstructs progression.

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  12. Katherine: I believe you expressed what I was attempting to say, but you did so more eloquently. Thank you.

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  13. Well put.

    As a teacher, I'd like to know how to get myself into that heavily compensated category.

    Out here in Arizona, the school districts are doing a pretty good job of making sure that the students are disadvantaged. As of the fall semester, there is no penalty for chearing and plagiarism.There are behaviors not measures of academic ability. Also, no student can receive lower than a 50 percent on a paper, project or test. I'm thinking these kids are going to be a bit disadvantaged when they find themselves competing against the workers of the rising nations.
    I'm digging the jazzy Christmas music.

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  14. #167 Dad: I wholeheartedly agree. We have the same nonsense all over the country. The jazzy Christmas music is part of my large compensation package, so I wanted to share the big bucks with you.

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  15. So glad I don't have to deal with political correctness in the classroom any more. The whole thing makes teaching more difficult. I'm with Katherine: "it can create a wall that effectively retards or obstructs progression."

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  16. The world is far too PC. I agree, life would be far simpler if we all told the truth.

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  17. A-M and KB: How did I know you would both feel that way?

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  18. JJ, This is one of your best musings. But you have many muses at your disposal. "A few are conversational minimalists." A few? I have the rest in my first and second periods! They're yours for the taking (wink!) I have a magnet on my fridge by Gloria Steinem, "The truth will set you free, but first it will piss you off."

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