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Turning Over New Leaf

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Life on the Mississippi–Revisted

200px-Life_on_the_Mississippi


Life on the Mississippi is the famous memoir by Mark Twain, who happens to be one of my favorite authors of all time. In fact, Twain was so good that Ernest Hemingway, upon winning the Nobel Prize for Literature, commented that it should have been awarded to Twain instead (Twain’s writing greatly influenced Hemingway’s work).

Life on the Mississippi reflects on Twain’s days as a steamboat pilot and adventurer traveling along the Mississippi River both before and after the American Civil War. Although not all the tales ring true, Twain does a masterful job painting life in that era, and glorifies the mighty river and its contribution to the building of American society.

One can hardly afford to pass up reading this book. As historical fiction, it gives us great insight into an age when railroads were king and greed ran rampant through the Midwest. As a Floridian, I am interested in the railroad Flagler built through the state of Florida into the Keys during the early part of the 20th century. Whenever I read Life on the Mississippi, I envision what it must have been like and picture similar difficulties and victories for railroad workers and seafarers alike.

On an unrelated note, Life on the Mississippi  is believed to be the first book ever submitted to a publishing house in the form of a typewritten manuscript.

7 comments:

  1. Sounds like a book I've got to read.

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  2. Mark Twain is by far one of my favorite people of all time! ..and everyone should get familiar with him at some point in life! Imagine having ever been able to meet him face to face at one of his many lectures ......! ;)

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  3. Twain's work IS amazing, he's one of my favorite too :), Miriam@Meatless Meals For Meat Eaters

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  4. Akseli: Especially for a guy who likes travel and adventure.

    Karen: I love his sense of humor as well.

    Miriam: I agree. He had such a tremendous influence on 20th century writing.

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  5. You know i have never read Twain.. but I will!!

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  6. Kath: Start with Huckleberry Finn.

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