Glory Days, My Ass




In 1988, actor Robert Conrad produced, directed, and starred in a movie entitled, Glory Days. The basic, quite common plot centered around a 50-year-old guy who stressed over the fact that life had passed him by. Thus, he embarked upon a series of new adventures designed to make up for lost time. Quite frankly, I have trouble identifying.

From my experience and perspective, some people have very short life spans, while others enjoy very long ones. I sincerely believe life passes us by if we choose to remain stagnant. How does one weigh a happy, fulfilling, exciting short life against an extremely long, boring, do nothing existence?

Please help me out here. More and more of my long-time friends use the term Glory Days to define their good memories, which to me is somewhat frightening. Why cannot a person build good memories at any age? 35 and 40-year-olds that profess to be over the hill scare the hell out of me.

The older I get, the more exciting I find life. It is so much more rewarding to become exposed to new ideas when one is mature enough to understand them. Sipping a glass of wine from the French Classification of 1855 or owning an original Dalí at age 20 is like putting Chanel N°5 on a pig.

Turn off the TV set, tell your doctor to pound salt, and erase all remnants of your high school days and you just might discover that your glory has yet to be discovered. Become an expert in Dickens, clowns of the 18th century, or mice. It really does not matter. What does matter is acquiring new knowledge of virtually any subject, as opposed to nourishing regrets over missed opportunities.

If you are 35, or 45, or 55 and blogging, rejoice, and wallow in the glory. Your grandparents never shared that experience with anyone.

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Comments

  1. I just knew you'd say this! I totally agree with you, and it seems my glory days are still happening, thank goodness and will any luck, they will keep on arriving day after day....in fact what they should make a movie about it how there just isn't enough time in the day to grasp it all......!

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  2. Karen S: Absolutely. It's a matter of priority.

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  3. You knew I'd agree w/you!. My glory days was back when I brought home my second child!. Not saying the first one wasn't, the birth of the second was fast and so easy.. So easy, I told people I wanted another... I enjoyed raising my girls, taking them to swim lessons, gymnastics, etc... So, I guess you could say my early 30's were my 'glory days'..

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  4. You are absolutely right JJ. When we are young we do not realise how fascinating life is and how many different good emotions are hidden behind any simple task. Only age gives us that and I feel blessed for living longer and healthier. This way I can enjoy live as never before and, in the very simple tasks of everyday live, I can frequently discover a hidden pleasure.

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  5. KBF: And now? Don't we continue to learn and grow?

    Fanático_Um: Oh yes. I am not very fond of diminishing a person's present by dwelling in the past. I know so many people that could continue to grow except for the fact that they have planted themselves in yesteryear.

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  6. I agree with you JJ. I see my life getting better as I age. Nicely done.

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  7. @JJ: Of course we continue to grow.. but my 30's stick out- when I was my happiest and content with my life.. Now, with the current things going on w/me, I have grown- but I wouldn't remember them as my 'glory' days.. but, another life lesson...
    Me? a hero?, naw, just me making my way thru trials of life.

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  8. KB: Good for you!

    KBF: One of these days, I'll send you a copy of my book, Surviving the Journey. That's what heroes do - they make their way through the trials of life.

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  9. JJ, I know my Glory Days are right around the corner. I also know that if one hasn't grown up by age 50, one doesn't have to. That is such a comfort to me. Hahahaha!!

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  10. "35 and 40-year-olds that profess to be over the hill scare the hell out of me."
    Hallelujah! I say just this sort of phrase so much right now. I am in this age range and I absolutely cannot stand people who talk about being 'old' or feeling worn out.
    You put nicely what I often just do not have the patience to deal with. I spend a lot of time with people who are 70 plus- we dance with them and enjoy how full of life they are, never ever uttering anything about being old.
    If you're old by 40, then you may as well just call it quits. It took me the first 30 years just to figure out that I don't have to be stuck living as others would have me to. Now I'm on a roll and not looking back!

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  11. Judie: I have no doubt your Glory Days are ahead of you. Now, write that book!

    Jasmine: Good for you. That's the way it should be.

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  12. Well said.

    I wouldn't denigrate the 20 year old's experience, though. I still remember and appreciate important new experiences from throughout my life.

    As well having new ones.

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  13. JJ- I made this video after my post about Harry Wild Jones. When you have a moment, I think you'll enjoy it. The house at 4629 Fremont has a few more views, and of course the street car is still alive and running!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pH-qEMOkelc

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  14. Here and now is where life's at. I didn't feel I had gotten anywhere till I was 50. At 60 I was sure I had it all together. At 70, having it all together no longer mattered for it was always all together all the way through. I'm no longer waiting for anything.Painting is my passion these days. I like writing the blog too almost as much, if not more. Who knows what's next? Be passionately busy today. I agree, all of my days have been glorious.

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  15. Jean: You are absolutely correct. I did not enjoy those experiences at 20, but I know many do. My goal was really to light a fire under the 40+ crowd.

    Linda: I agree, and good for you. I also love blogging. I thought a couple of years ago the concept was much different, but I have developed some good friendships.

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  16. Karen: The homes are gorgeous. In the past, my wife and I restored a few homes in Vermont and New Hampshire that deserved the same kind of reverence. Truly magnificent. Thank you.

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  17. Glory days or good ol' days--I'm fine to leave them in the past. There is no age I would go back to, especially my teen and young adult years. Maybe I will get to an age where I think it's downhill, but I'm 60 now and that hasn't happened yet.

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  18. Galen: I know you have a good grip on things. I do worry about others, mostly my childhood friends.

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